Author Topic: Miss Nepal 2008 Contestents  (Read 43536 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

tundikhel

  • Global Moderator
  • ******
  • Posts: 15365
Re: Miss Nepal 2008 Contestents
« Reply #10 on: July 26, 2009, 11:32:19 PM »
Attire depends on dress code
Q: How do you feel about the last-minute postponement of Miss Nepal 2008?

Nisha Adhikari: First of all, we were informed two weeks prior to the postponement, so we were prepared for it. The delay in a way has been good for us as we had very little time to prepare. In the previous contest, participants were given three months of rigorous training while this time we had only a month-long training period.
Q: Who is responsible for the postponement of the show?

Nisha: The present dispute is mainly due to a misunderstanding between the sponsors and the organizers. Of course, the Maoists are protesting and the government is doing nothing about it. But it is the sponsors' demand for more time that is delaying it.
Q: Is it a coincidence that both ultra-rightist and leftist forces are protesting against the beauty pageant?

Nisha: It could be a coincidence. The Maoists seem to be hijacking the agenda of the Hindu fanatics to draw the attention of the people and claim that they too oppose such events. They condemn nudity when our religion itself reveres it. Why is the body of gods and goddesses specially structured to fit the 32-26-34 model? Just to recall, in the Mahabharata, Ganga is always shown half-naked. Neither the Maoists nor the sadhus can say anything to that. They have no actual motive. They just do not want to let Miss Nepal happen.
Q: So Miss Nepal has been wrongly called a display of nudity?

Nisha: No, it is not nudity. I remember having an interaction program earlier and we discussed nudity. What I told them was that women had to wear different dresses depending upon the dress code. In a swimming pool, you have to wear a swimming costume. Similarly, in a beauty pageant, you have to wear a gown. The Maoists should refrain from senseless ranting and use their common sense when they talk of nudity in beauty pageants. If they really see "nudity", they should come up with nude pictures from earlier shows that have been telecast live.
Q: Don't you think beauty pageants have been unnecessarily politicized?

Nisha: Right now, yes. The Maoists are merely trying to dictate to us. But we do not believe in Maoist ideology. Nepal is already a federal republican country, and no one has the right to impose Maoist ideals on us.
Q: Have you been personally threatened for participating in the show?

Nisha: No, not yet.
Q: Don't you think your rights have been trampled upon?

Nisha: Yes, we have a right to participate, and we are not going to give in to Maoist demands. We are all mature individuals.  The Maoists must stop infringing on our fundamental rights.
Q: Some people say beauty contests are of no use in an underdeveloped country like Nepal.

Nisha: I think they are more important for underdeveloped countries. Nepal seldom gets noticed in the international area. But if a Nepali beauty queen is given the chance to represent her country at an international beauty contest, it will be known all over the world. So beauty contests must be analyzed in a global context and not through narrow vision.
Q: Do you think the Maoists are trying to impose Taliban-type rule in a federal democratic state?

Nisha: Exactly. It seems they are heading towards something similar. But they must understand that this is a democratic country. If the Maoists go on imposing a ban on such things, women will get nowhere. It is pathetic that the Maoists are least bothered about Nepali swimmers and runners in the Beijing Olympics, but they won't tolerate anything when it comes to Miss Nepal.